Aircraft Phase Inspections

by Brent
(USA)

Can you explain phase inspections for a turbine aircraft?


ANSWER: FAR 91.409(e) requires the owner/operator of a turbine-powered aircraft to select a maintenance program they will use. They typically choose the manufacturer’s recommended program. Some manufacturers may call their inspections phase inspections. Others may use letters to indentify the inspections (e.g., A check, B check, C check, etc.)

Breaking up the entire inspection of a large or more complex aircraft into sections (phases) reduces the amount of time the aircraft is on the ground for any given inspection.

This provides the owner/operator flexibility in maintaining and operating their aircraft. Over a period of time the entire aircraft is inspected. Then the cycle begins again.

In addition to these inspections, there may be special inspections that are not in line with the phase inspections. These would have to be done at the recommended intervals.

Also there are components that may require overhaul or replacement at specified intervals, and those may not be in line with the phase inspections.

How many phase inspections are there for a turbine aircraft such as a King Air?

ANSWER: I don’t have access to their current program, but if I recall correctly there are four phases to a King Air inspection program.

What are included in these inspections, and when are they due?

ANSWER: The manufacturer will determine the inspection intervals and what will be inspected at each interval. It will typically be divided into Wings, Empanage, Fuselage and Engines. I belive each phase inspection on a King Air is at 200-hour intervals.

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