Aircraft Export Certification

Certification Procedures

An aircraft export certification can only be issued to an aircraft that is registered in the United States.

An FAA Form 8130-1 is used to make application for an export certificate of airworthiness. Only Part I of the form is used for aircraft. You can download the application and find instructions on how to fill it out in the forms section of this website.

An Export C of A may be issued only for COMPLETE aircraft that is shown by the applicant to meet the applicable requirements specified under FAR Part 21.329 . Aircraft exported disassembled are considered a complete aircraft.

A new or used U.S. manufactured aircraft located in the United States does not require a standard airworthiness certificate or a special airworthiness certificate in the restricted or primary category to be issued prior to export, but the aircraft must meet the same requirements.

A new or used U.S. manufactured aircraft located outside of the United States must possess a standard airworthiness certificate or a special airworthiness certificate in the restricted or primary category prior to the issuance of an export.

All aircraft manufactured outside the U.S. are required to possess a valid U.S. standard airworthiness certificate issued under the provisions of FAR Part 21.183(c) , or a special airworthiness certificate in the restricted category issued under the provisions of FAR Part 21.185(c) before an export airworthiness approval can be issued.

Any aircraft not meeting the requirements for a standard airworthiness certificate, or a special airworthiness certificate in the restricted or primary category, are not eligible to receive an Export C of A unless the importing country accepts the aircraft in accordance with FAR Part 21.329(b) .

You should assemble all of the aircraft's records in an organized easy to review format. The record requirements are the same as that required for a standard airworthiness certificate, so you can download our inspection checklist to help you prepare for your records for review. Preparing your records as explained in the checklist should save you time and avoid potential problems when the DAR arrives on site.

The next step is to contact a Designated Airworthiness Representative (DAR) to make an appointment for a physical inspection of the aircraft and a review of the records. The DAR will identify any areas that require further information and/or require further action in order to meet the requirements. Usually, they will offer possible solutions to correct the discrepancies noted.

There are numerous variables involved in an aircraft export certification (i.e., records accuracy, aircraft discrepancies, modification approvals, etc.), making it difficult to say the exact amount of time it will take for any given certification. However, the DAR you select should have a good idea of the time it has taken on similar projects and give you a reasonable estimate.

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